Posts Tagged Thermal bridging

Low Carbon House Design | Part 5

Elements of Low Carbon House Design

In this article, we will study the elements of low carbon house including design of windows and skylights, door air-gaps, airtightness, thermal bridging and understanding monthly energy demand profiles.

Windows and skylights

Ultra-efficient triple glazing will be used for windows and skylights in combination with insulated timber frame. According to Passivhaus standard, 1990, the resultant U-value will be 0.8 W/m2K.

Use of LED lights. Making use of day lighting from the roof and the windows. This would help reduce the reliance on artificial lighting. Shutters and louvers can be used to control solar gain and glare. (Halliday, 2008 p. 69)

Door Air-gaps

Loss of energy can be prevented by installing automatic door closers. The inside of the doors can be installed with brush strips to close the air gaps near the flooring. Modern, well-insulated doors can improve comfort levels by decreasing loss of heating and cooling.

Airtightness

It is estimated that up to 15% of energy is wasted to losses through the building fabric. Of those losses, up to 20% energy can be lost through windows and roof, while up to 35% heat energy lost is through air gaps near the doors..

Airtightness

Airtightness. Source: Carbontrust.com

 

To ensure airtightness of the building, wet plaster will be applied to the inside of the wall. This will minimise shrinkage between the wall and the floor. Airtightness tapes and membranes will be used to seal all the corner joints of windows and doors. Airtightness tape will be applied at junctions with plaster. It will make the low carbon house 20 times more airtight as compared to the standard homes built according to the building regulations (Passivhaus, 1990).

Airtightness grommets will be used around cabling and pipework to ensure that there is no leakage of air.


Continue Reading

, , , , , , ,

No Comments