Mechanical Ventilation and Rainwater Harvesting | Eco House Design – Part 8





Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR)

The Waste House building is highly energy efficient, and to achieve that it has very high levels of air-tightness to prevent heat transfer between the house and surrounding environment. Hence, to provide adequate ventilation to the house along with maintaining energy efficiency, a mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery could be used. A heat recovery system with 92% heat recovery efficiency will be used which would be Passivhaus Institute certified.

mechanical ventilation

Mechanical Ventilation. Source: www.homeventilation.co.uk

This system works by extracting heat from areas of a dwelling which generate heat and moisture, like the kitchen and bathroom, and then distributing that heat to other areas of the house. Living room and Bedrooms have air ducting installed to supply pre-heated fresh air into them.

Fresh air is drawn into the house with the help of a suction pump through the supply air ducting which is generally installed on the roof. Stale air is expelled from the house through another ducting, away from supply air ducting. The stale air is passed through the heat recovery unit before it is exhausted. Fresh air is also passed through the heat recovery unit, where it is heated and filtered before pumping it into the house.

Some systems have a feature so that when it’s warm outside, the air can bypass the heat exchanger to help keep the house cool. This system can potentially reduce heating costs and also keep the home environment fresh. It is a low-energy and highly efficient ventilation process.

The Waste House is built to Passivhaus standards, and hence a heat recovery ventilation system is necessary to satisfy efficiency requirements. This system can also be combined with ground source heat pump to improve efficiency of the process.

Rainwater Harvesting system

Code for Sustainable Homes encourages fitting rge underground tanks to the new development projects to collect rainwater for flushing toilets, washing clothes and watering gardens etc. A reduction of 50% water usage from the mains has been recorded (Code for Sustainable Homes, 2007).

Rainwater Harvesting system will be installed on the site to aid water conservation. To aid to water conservation, permeable surfaces will be provided around the waste house.

Below are the steps to designing a low carbon house:

Eco House Design : Part 1

Introduction to the Eco House Design Guide

Design Methodology : Part 2
Eco House Design: Part 3

  • Climate of Brighton and Hove
  • Orientation of the building
  • Building design, construction and low energy specifications
 Eco House Design : Part 4

  • Insulation: Active Thermal Insulation
  • Roof Design
Eco House Design: Part 5

  • Windows and skylights;
  • Door air-gaps
  • Airtightness
  • Thermal Bridging
  • Monthly Energy Demand Profiles
Eco House Design : Renewable Energy Sources| Part 6

Ground Source Heat pump

 Eco House Design : Renewable Energy Sources| Part 7

Solar Electricity Generation

Eco House Design : Renewable Energy Sources| Part 8

  • Rainwater harvesting system
  • Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery

Eco House Design : Renewable Energy Sources| Part 9

Annual Energy Balance

Eco House Design : Part 10 | Conclusion

 



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